Peace and War is our Choice LO30185

From: Terry Priebe (terryp@dca.net)
Date: 05/16/03


Replying to LO30156 --

Dear Professor Passi and LO'ers:

You wrote a most provocative contribution, part quoted below.

 " We know that many of the living animals do not kill their own species.
But why has Man grown to do so? Is it that during evolution, man had
acquired to fight for survival? Is it compulsive, accidental or survival
behavior? Once I was looking at the exhibits in a museum. I found that
many of those exhibits were related to conflicts, fights, and battles. I
asked a question to myself ^ "Is it that the museum has exclusively and
purposely chosen such exhibits?" If yes, why so? A question came to my
mind, when and how have men acquired this behavior of fighting and killing
each other? Why are we failing to overcome this avoidable behavior? I
reflected further and found that we do not kill each other within families
that live in intimacy and trust. In such families and in our groups, we
live in harmony. The whole question moves to trust building. This means
that the problem perhaps lies in our up-bringing in homes, schools, and
environment. Some parents purchase guns and tanks and give them as
presents to their own children. Why do they do so? "

Could the reason "we are the way we are" is because of the small portion
of human free energy that is devoted to "another way"?

This week the issue you discuss was echoed among some of my friends. We
were at a loss to recall when we experienced or even knew of sustained
educational processes that would better equip us and our offspring to
"work out of 'war' ".

Possibly a 4th "R" would be useful... along with reading and (r)writing
and (r)arithmetic... we could add "relationships"... to your point of
intimacy and trust.

Best Regards,

Terry Priebe
terryp@dca.net

-- 

"Terry Priebe" <terryp@dca.net>

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